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Sunday, 22 July 2018

Joseph Ceravolo, Mexico City, September 1960: the luminous mountain, the uncovered heart ("all we owe / to darkness") | The political re-education of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez: Behind closed inner party doors

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811 | by sotblindphot
 
811: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 19 July 2018
 
811 | by sotblindphot
 
811: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 19 July 2018

811 | by sotblindphot
 
811: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 19 July 2018

816 | by sotblindphot
 
816: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 20 July 2018

816 | by sotblindphot
 
816: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 20 July 2018

816 | by sotblindphot
 
816: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 20 July 2018

20150708-193548SW | by AlexM.

  20150708-193548SW [Barsaner, Maramures, Romania]: photo by AlexM., 8 July 2015

20150708-193548SW | by AlexM.

  20150708-193548SW [Barsaner, Maramures, Romania]: photo by AlexM., 8 July 2015

20150708-193548SW | by AlexM.

  20150708-193548SW [Barsaner, Maramures, Romania]: photo by AlexM., 8 July 2015

2458 | by pkomo

2458: photo by Petros Kotzabasis, 2 August 2014

812 | by sotblindphot
 
812: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 18 July 2018

812 | by sotblindphot
 
812: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 18 July 2018

812 | by sotblindphot
 
812: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 18 July 2018

2005 | by pkomo

810 09515 | by sotblindphot

81009515: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 17 July 2018

810 09515 | by sotblindphot

81009515: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 17 July 2018

810 09515 | by sotblindphot

81009515: photo by Sotiris Lamprou, 17 July 2018

Joseph Ceravolo: O Heart Uncovered: the darkness beneath the snow range
 
File:IztaccihualtSacromonte1.JPG

Iztaccihuatl - as seen from the Sacromonte mountain in Amecameca, Mexico State: photo by Alejandro Linares Garcia, 21 February 2010
Joseph Ceravolo: O Heart Uncovered

We lived in province snow range
and something that we uncover

is like living
in one Arizona room
when we discover all we owe

to darkness 
we never really know.

Tomorrow is the national holiday for independence --

no more left.
For the first time
we see the mountains

with snow on them pulling away 
from the mountains and clouds.

Joseph Ceravolo (1934-1988): O Heart Uncovered, 15 September 1960, from Transmigration Solo (1960-1965), in Collected Poems (2012)

"Iztaccíhuatl" = Nahuatl: "White woman", indicating the four individual snow-capped peaks which depict the head, chest, knees and feet of a sleeping female when seen from east or west. Iztaccíhuatl is to the north of Popocatépetl, to which it is connected by the high altitude Paso de Cortés. Depending on atmospheric conditions Iztaccíhuatl, the nation's third largest peak (5,230 m = 17,160 ft) and the lowest peak containing permanent snow and glaciers in Mexico. is visible much of the year from Mexico City, some 70 km (43 mi) to the northwest, where this poem was written.

File:Mexico City volcanos.jpg

Popocatépetl and Iztaccihuatl | An exceptional view to the east of Mexico City from Polanco District. Viewing the two volcanos: Popo and Iztla. Taken early in the morning before pollution sets. [San Alvaro, Mexico City, Distrito Federal]: photo by Jorge Altamirano, 8 January 2008

File:Volcanes DF.JPG

Volcanes de México, DF; el Popocatepetl y el Ixtlacihuatl al amanecer [Mexican volcanoes Popocatépetl and Iztaccihuatl at sunrise]: photo by Joaquin Martinez Rosado, 16 May 2010

15 de Septiembre 2009 04050 | by Omar Omar

15 de Septiembre 2009 04050 | El Grito de la Independencia Mexicana, 15 de Septiembre, Centro Historico, México DF: photo by Omar Bárcena, 15 September 2009


 Officials record and examine cygnets and swans during the annual census of the Queen's swans, known as 'Swan Upping', along the River Thames. Photo @tobymelville: image via Reuters Pictures @reuterspictures, 21 July 2018



"Toby Melville's photo describes terrorism, confusion, fear, but also the human bond": Jury member @emanmohammedD on why this is one of six World Press Photo of the Year nominees.: image via Wprld Press Photo @WorldPressPhoto, 11 April 2018

 

#Nicaragua Hundreds of protesters marched in Managua in defiance of an iron-fisted crackdown on dissent by President Daniel Ortega @AFPphoto: image via AFP Photo @AFPphoto, 21 July 2018



#Nicaragua Hundreds of protesters marched in Managua in defiance of an iron-fisted crackdown on dissent by President Daniel Ortega @AFPphoto: image via AFP Photo @AFPphoto, 21 July 2018


  
#Nicaragua Hundreds of protesters marched in Managua in defiance of an iron-fisted crackdown on dissent by President Daniel Ortega @AFPphoto: image via AFP Photo @AFPphoto, 21 July 2018


  
#Nicaragua Hundreds of protesters marched in Managua in defiance of an iron-fisted crackdown on dissent by President Daniel Ortega @AFPphoto: image via AFP Photo @AFPphoto, 21 July 2018


O-C: the re-education of



Congressional nominee Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez stands with Zephyr Teachout after endorsing her for New York City Public Advocate on July 12, 2018 in New York City.: photo by Spencer Platt / Getty via Jacobin, 16 July 2018

Ocasio-Cortez, the Left, and the Future of Palestine: Ocasio-Cortez missed an opportunity to push a left position on Israel. But it's not too late to change that.: Corey Robin, Jacobin, 16 July 2018 (extracts)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez had a bad moment late last week.


Appearing on the reboot of Firing Line, Ocasio-Cortez was asked by conservative host Margaret Hoover to explain her stance on Israel. The question left Ocasio-Cortez tongue-tied and equivocating. Here was the exchange:

MH: You, in the campaign, made one tweet, or made one statement, that referred to a killing by Israeli soldiers of civilians in Gaza and called it a “massacre,” which became a little bit controversial. But I haven’t seen anywhere — what is your position on Israel?
AOC: Well, I believe absolutely in Israel’s right to exist. I am a proponent of a two-state solution. And for me, it’s not — this is not a referendum, I think, on the state of Israel. For me, the lens through which I saw this incident, as an activist, as an organizer, if sixty people were killed in Ferguson, Missouri, if sixty people were killed in the South Bronx — unarmed — if sixty people were killed in Puerto Rico — I just looked at that incident more through . . . through just, as an incident, and to me, it would just be completely unacceptable if that happened on our shores. But I am —
MH: Of course the dynamic there in terms of geopolitics —
AOC: Of course.
MH: And the war in the Middle East is very different than people expressing their First Amendment right to protest.
AOC: Well, yes. But I also think that what people are starting to see at least in the occupation of Palestine is just an increasing crisis of humanitarian condition, and that to me is just where I tend to come from on this issue.
MH: You use the term “the occupation of Palestine”? What did you mean by that?
AOC: Oh, um [pause] I think it, what I meant is the settlements that are increasing in some of these areas and places where Palestinians are experiencing difficulty in access to their housing and homes.
MH: Do you think you can expand on that?
AOC: Yeah, I mean, I think I’d also just [waves hands and laughs] I am not the expert on geopolitics on this issue. You know, for me, I’m a firm believer in finding a two-state solution on this issue, and I’m happy to sit down with leaders on both of these. For me, I just look at things through a human rights lens, and I may not use the right words [laughs] I know this is a very intense issue.
MH: That’s very honest, that’s very honest. It’s very honest, and when, you, you know, get to Washington and you’re an elected member of Congress you’ll have the opportunity to talk to people on all sides and visit Israel and visit the West Bank and —
AOC: Absolutely, absolutely. And I think that that’s one of those things that’s important too is that, you know, especially with the district that I represent — I come from the South Bronx, I come from a Puerto Rican background, and Middle Eastern politics was not exactly at my kitchen table every night. But, I also recognize that this is an intensely important issue for people in my district, for Americans across the country, and I think what’s at least important to communicate is that I’m willing to listen and that I’m willing to learn and evolve on this issue like I think many Americans are.

Let’s be clear. This is not good. Prompted about her use of the word “massacre,” Ocasio-Cortez doesn’t stay with the experience of the Palestinians. Instead, she goes immediately to an affirmation of Israel’s right to exist, as if Israelis were the first order of concern here, and affirming that right were the necessary ticket to saying anything about Palestine. Asked about her use of the phrase “occupation of Palestine,” Ocasio-Cortez wanders into a thicket of abstractions about access to housing and “settlements that are increasing in some of these areas.” She apologizes for not being an expert on a major geopolitical issue. She proffers liberal platitudes about a two-state solution that everyone familiar with the subject knows are just words and clichés designed to defer any genuine reckoning with the situation at hand, with no concrete discussion of anything the US could or should do to intervene.
 * 
This is not just about Palestine. This is about US foreign policy as a whole. It used to be that US foreign policy was the Left’s strong suit. Back in the 1970s, when it seemed as if the Left’s confidence in its economic policies and positions was flagging, its critiques of US imperialism, military spending, and the national security state were in ascendancy. Some of these positions even made it into the left wing of the Democratic Party. Since then, the Left has gotten very weak on this stuff. Not in terms of its moralism on foreign policy, or the antiwar rallies it will show up at, but in terms of being able to advance a position that would begin to command national assent, form public opinion, and then be translated into policy.

This is a problem: it should be the easiest thing in the world right now, for example, to go after runaway military spending. Yet there’s hardly a credible or potent left voice that is pushing that agenda, much less getting a hearing within even progressive circles of the Democratic Party. Indeed, in this age of alleged partisan polarization, authorizations of massive increases in spending for the Pentagon and the CIA pass both houses of Congress with hefty Democratic majorities — with scarcely anyone noticing, much less protesting.

So, again, this isn’t about Palestine only. Or I should say, Palestine is the proverbial canary in a coal mine. From Palestine you get into the question of the Middle East as a whole, which leads to US foreign policy as a whole, and issues of budgets, spending, war, peace, and all the rest. All the more reason for Ocasio-Cortez to get up to speed on it.

Like it or not, Ocasio-Cortez has been elevated to a national position of leadership and visibility on the Left. If she wins in the general election, as everyone believes she will, every single thing she says and does will be watched and scrutinized. It simply will not do to say, oh, she’s only twenty-eight, oh, the media is so nasty, oh, let’s not have circular firing squads. The media is always nasty, the Left will always be critical of its leaders, and one day, soon, Ocasio-Cortez will no longer be twenty-eight. To complain about any of these things is like shaking your fist at the weather (weather in the old-fashioned sense; before climate change).

People have turned to Ocasio-Cortez not simply because she won but because she’s good at what she does: she’s smart, fast, funny, and principled. Because she’s shown leadership. I understand the pressures she’s under. But as her star rises, the pressures will only increase. Ocasio-Cortez needs to be not only strong but also clear on this issue. She needs to be as subtle, dexterous, and sharp as she is on other issues, virtually every night on Twitter. This isn’t a game, especially when it comes to Israel. Or, if it is a game, she needs to be a better player.


Untitled | by Johan Jehlbo

Untitled: photo by Johan Jehibo, 20 July 2018

Earthlings: Habitat | by Teresa's Place/

Earthlings: Habitat | Lisboa, 2011: photo by Teresa's Place, 28 December 2011

Earthlings: Habitat | by Teresa's Place/

Earthlings: Habitat | Lisboa, 2011: photo by Teresa's Place, 28 December 2011

Earthlings: Habitat | by Teresa's Place/

Earthlings: Habitat | Lisboa, 2011: photo by Teresa's Place, 28 December 2011