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Wednesday, 19 December 2012

Arbitrage


.

Hurricane Sandy New York Blackout: photo by David Shankbone, 30 October 2012


...their having stumbled into
a free market wonder

land in which value
had come to seem forever

detached from even the
thought of actual labor,

there grew among the young
men on the Street

an assumption that
they could do anything...






Hurricane Sandy Blackout New York Skyline: photo by David Shankbone, 30 October 2012

6 comments:

TC said...

Soooo... we had just seen the Richard Gere hedge-fund-juggling, book-cooking "character" (!!) come out smelling like a plastic rose in the not-very-hard-hitting high-finance-naughtiness pic Arbitrage, when we caught a glimpse of The Implode-O-Meter.

Really it's impossible to keep up with the unreality in reality any more.

TC said...

A whiff of the money.

Phew!

STEPHEN RATCLIFFE said...

Tom,

Ha! "free market wonder" -- the Implodometer tells another tale. Link to Arbitrage doesn't seem to work (maybe another blackout).


12.19

light coming into sky above black plane
of ridge, silver of planet below branch
in foreground, wave sounding in channel

concealment that comes over
things, relation that

would be, see point of view,
beyond this the field

cloudless blue sky reflected in channel,
sunlit white cloud to the left of point

Hazen said...

That dark swath, creeping relentlessly toward the Illuminated Finger To The World, is the sort of outer darkness into which those we-can-do-anything boys on the Street should be cast, along with their assorted (and sordid) ‘instruments’ of financial whizz-bangery.

Wooden Boy said...

"in which value/ had come to seem forever"

The illusion that has us all suckered.

TC said...

It's the strangest thing, all during the unfolding saga of the evil conniving vain predatory terribly handsome impeccably-dressed-and-groomed billionaire hedge fund tycoon and his clan of insipid duplicit complicit family members, one expected -- well, wanted -- him (and them) to get what he (and they) so richly deserved, in the end.

The error must have lay in the expecting, the wanting.


(Steve, BTW, that trailer will come up if you have the time to wait a moment...)